Buy Oxytrol Online

What is Oxytrol?

Oxytrol (oxybutynin) reduces muscle spasms of the bladder and urinary tract.

Oxytrol transdermal skin patch is used to treat symptoms of overactive bladder, such as frequent or urgent urination, incontinence (urine leakage), and increased nighttime urination.

Oxytrol may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Important information about Oxytrol

Do not use Oxytrol if you are allergic to oxybutynin, or if you have uncontrolled glaucoma, a blockage in your stomach or intestines, or if you are unable to urinate. Oxybutynin can cause blurred vision, drowsiness, or dizziness. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert and able to see clearly. Drinking alcohol can increase certain side effects of Oxytrol.

Avoid becoming overheated or dehydrated during exercise and in hot weather. Drink plenty of fluids to keep yourself hydrated while you are using Oxytrol.

Do not expose the Oxytrol patch to sunlight. It should be worn under clothing. The Oxytrol patch may burn your skin if you wear the patch during an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging). Remove the patch before undergoing such a test.

Before using Oxytrol

Do not use Oxytrol if you are allergic to oxybutynin, or if you have:

  • untreated or uncontrolled glaucoma;

  • a blockage in your digestive tract (stomach or intestines); or

  • if you have decreased urination or are unable to urinate.

To make sure you can safely use Oxytrol, tell your doctor if you have any of these other conditions:

  • glaucoma;

  • liver disease;

  • kidney disease;

  • myasthenia gravis;

  • an enlarged prostate;

  • an intestinal disorder, such as ulcerative colitis; or

  • a stomach disorder such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) or slow digestion.

FDA pregnancy category B. Oxytrol is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether oxybutynin passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use Oxytrol without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How should I use Oxytrol?

Use Oxytrol exactly as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended. Follow the directions on your prescription label.

Oxytrol comes with patient instructions for safe and effective use. Follow these directions carefully. Ask your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions.

To use the Oxytrol patch, open the sealed pouch and remove the protective liner. Apply the transdermal patch to a clean, dry area on your stomach, hip or buttock. Avoid skin that is oily, irritated, or damaged. Avoid placing the patch on a skin area that will be rubbed by a waistband or tight clothing.

Press the Oxytrol patch onto the skin and press it down firmly with your fingers. Make sure the patch is well sealed around the edges. When properly applied, the patch should stay on while swimming or bathing.

Leave the Oxytrol patch in place and wear it for 3 to 4 days. You should change the patch twice per week. Each time you apply a new patch, choose a different skin area on your stomach, hip, or buttock. Do not apply a patch to the same skin twice within one week.

Try to change your Oxytrol patch on the same two days each week (such as every Sunday and Thursday). There is a calendar printed on the package of this medication to help you establish a steady patch-changing schedule.

If the patch falls off, try sticking it back on. If it does not stay on, replace it with a new one and wear it until your next regular patch-changing day. Do not change your schedule, even if you apply a new patch to replace one that has fallen off.

After removing an Oxytrol patch, fold it in half so it sticks together and throw it away in a place where children or pets cannot get to it.

Use baby oil or mild soap and water to remove any adhesive residue that stays on your skin. Avoid using harsh soaps, alcohol, nail polish remover, or other solvents that could irritate your skin.

The Oxytrol patch may burn your skin if you wear the patch during an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging). Remove the patch before undergoing such a test. Keep the Oxytrol patch in its sealed pouch until you are ready to use it. Store the pouches at room temperature away from heat and moisture.

What happens if I miss a dose?

If you forget to change a patch on your scheduled day, remove and replace the patch as soon as you remember. Wear the patch until your next regular patch-changing day. Do not change your schedule, even if you wear the new patch for less that 3 days.

Do not apply two patches at the same time to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Overdose symptoms may include restlessness, tingly feeling, fever, uneven heart rate, vomiting, and urinating less than usual or not at all.

What should I avoid while using Oxytrol?

Oxytrol can cause blurred vision, drowsiness, or dizziness. Be careful if you drive or do anything that requires you to be alert and able to see clearly. Drinking alcohol can increase certain side effects of oxybutynin.

Avoid becoming overheated or dehydrated during exercise and in hot weather. Drink plenty of fluids to keep yourself hydrated while you are using Oxytrol.

Do not expose the Oxytrol transdermal patch to sunlight. It should be worn under clothing.

Oxytrol side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction to Oxytrol: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Stop using Oxytrol and call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as:

  • fever with hot, dry skin;

  • uneven heart rate;

  • pain or burning when you urinate;

  • urinating less than usual or not at all; or

  • severe itching, burning, or blistering that does not clear up within several hours after removing the skin patch.

Less serious Oxytrol side effects may include:

  • mild skin itching, burning, redness, or discoloration where a patch was worn;

  • dizziness, drowsiness, weakness;

  • dry eyes, blurred vision;

  • dry mouth;

  • warmth, tingling, or redness under your skin;

  • nausea, vomiting, stomach pain;

  • constipation or diarrhea;

  • stuffy nose;

  • back pain;

  • feeling restless; or

  • sleep problems (insomnia).

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

What other drugs will affect Oxytrol?

Before using Oxytrol, tell your doctor if you regularly use other medicines that make you sleepy (such as cold or allergy medicine, sedatives, narcotic pain medicine, sleeping pills, muscle relaxers, and medicine for seizures, depression, or anxiety). They can add to sleepiness caused by oxybutynin.

Tell your doctor about all other medicines you use, especially:

  • atropine (Donnatal, and others);

  • belladonna;

  • dicyclomine (Bentyl);

  • glycopyrrolate (Robinul);

  • hyoscyamine (Anaspaz, Cystospaz, Levsin, and others);

  • mepenzolate (Cantil);

  • methantheline (Provocholine);

  • methscopolamine (Pamine);

  • propantheline (Pro-Banthine);

  • scopolamine (Transderm-Scop);

  • an antibiotic such as clarithromycin (Biaxin), dalfopristin/quinupristin (Synercid), erythromycin (E.E.S., EryPed, Ery-Tab, Erythrocin, Pediazole), or telithromycin (Ketek); or

  • antifungal medicine such as itraconazole (Sporanox), ketoconazole (Extina, Ketozole, Nizoral, Xolegal), miconazole (Oravig), or voriconazole (Vfend).

This list is not complete and other drugs may interact with Oxytrol. Tell your doctor about all medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor.

For the Consumer

Applies to oxybutynin: oral syrup, oral tablet, oral tablet extended release

Along with its needed effects, oxybutynin (the active ingredient contained in Oxytrol) may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention.

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur while taking oxybutynin:

Rare
  • Eye pain
  • skin rash or hives

Get emergency help immediately if any of the following symptoms of overdose occur while taking oxybutynin:

Symptoms of overdose
  • Clumsiness or unsteadiness
  • confusion
  • convulsions
  • dizziness
  • drowsiness (severe)
  • fainting
  • fast, slow, or irregular heartbeat
  • fever
  • flushing or redness of the face
  • hallucinations (seeing, hearing, or feeling things that are not there)
  • shortness of breath or troubled breathing
  • unusual excitement, nervousness, restlessness, or irritability

Some side effects of oxybutynin may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them:

More common
  • Acid or sour stomach
  • belching
  • decreased sweating
  • diarrhea
  • difficulty having a bowel movement (stool)
  • drowsiness
  • dryness of the eyes, mouth, nose, or throat
  • heartburn
  • indigestion
  • runny nose
  • stomach discomfort, upset, or pain
Less common or rare
  • Blurred vision
  • decreased flow of breast milk
  • decreased sexual ability
  • difficulty in swallowing
  • feeling of warmth or heat
  • headache
  • increased sensitivity of the eyes to light
  • nausea or vomiting
  • trouble with sleeping
  • unusual tiredness or weakness
Incidence not known - Observed during clinical practice with oxybutynin; estimates of frequency cannot be determined
  • Bloating or swelling of the face, arms, hands, lower legs, or feet
  • decreased interest in sexual intercourse
  • inability to have or keep an erection
  • loss in sexual ability, desire, drive, or performance
  • rapid weight gain
  • tingling of the hands or feet
  • unusual weight gain or loss

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Applies to oxybutynin: oral syrup, oral tablet, oral tablet extended release, transdermal film extended release, transdermal gel

Nervous system

Very common (10% or more): Dizziness, somnolence
Common (1% to 10%): Headache, confusion, insomnia, nervousness, convulsions, dysgeusia
Frequency not reported: Heat stroke, paralysis, coma, CNS excitation

Gastrointestinal

Reports of moderate to severe dry mouth was significantly lower in the group of people taking oxybutynin (the active ingredient contained in Oxytrol) extended-release form in a study, at the same daily dose, comparing it to oxybutynin immediate-release. The reported incidence of dry mouth with the extended-release formulation is lower with the use of lower daily doses.

Dry mouth has been mentioned as the primary reason given by patients for discontinuation of therapy.

Very common (10% or more): Dry mouth, constipation, nausea
Common (1% to 10%): Dyspepsia, diarrhea, flatulence, vomiting, decreased GI motility, loose stools, aptyalism, eructation, tongue coated, gastroesophageal reflux, abdominal pain, taste perversion
Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Dysphagia, frequent bowel movements
Frequency not reported: Taste perversion

Cardiovascular

Common (1% to 10%): Palpitations, peripheral edema, tachycardia, vasodilation, hypertension, chest pain
Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Hot flush
Rare (less than 0.1%): Chest discomfort
Frequency not reported: Hypotension
Postmarketing reports: QT interval prolongation, arrhythmia, flushing

Dermatologic

Very common (10% or more): Pruritis with transdermal system
Common (1% to 10%): Decreased sweating, dry skin, rash, pruritus
Frequency not reported: Application site vesicles, macules, burning, rash, and erythema with transdermal system.

Genitourinary

Very common (10% or more): Impaired urination, urinary tract infections
Common (1% to 10%): Increased post void retention, urinary retention, impotence, urinary hesitancy, dysuria, pollakiuria
Frequency not reported: Dysuria, cystitis, aggravation of symptoms of prostatic hypertrophy

Endocrine

Postmarketing reports: Suppression of lactation

Metabolic

Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Anorexia, fluid retention, increased blood glucose
Frequency not reported: Dehydration, aggravation of hyperthyroidism symptoms

Ocular

Very common (10% or more): Blurred vision
Common (1% to 10%): Cycloplegia, dry eyes, mydriasis, keratoconjunctivitis sicca, eye irritation
Frequency not reported: Acute angle closure glaucoma, amblyopia, decreased lacrimation
Postmarketing reports: Glaucoma

Respiratory

Common (1% to 10%): Rhinitis, bronchitis, nasal dryness, oropharyngeal pain, cough, dry throat, sinus/nasal congestion, hoarseness, asthma, dry nasal and sinus mucous membranes
Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Dysphonia
Frequency not reported: Upper respiratory tract infections, sinusitis, bronchitis, pharyngitis, respiratory failure

Musculoskeletal

Common (1% to 10%): Asthenia, back pain, arthralgia, pain in extremity, flank pain
Frequency not reported: Arthritis

Psychiatric

Common (1% to 10%): Depression, nervousness, insomnia, confusional state
Frequency not reported: Cognitive and mental status changes in elderly patients
Postmarketing reports: Hallucinations, psychotic disorder, agitation, memory impairment

Other

Common (1% to 10%): Fatigue, fungal infection
Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Thirst
Frequency not reported: Accidental injury, flu syndrome, flushing, fever
Postmarketing reports: Falls

Hypersensitivity

Frequency not reported: Angioedema with airway obstruction, urticaria, and face edema and rare anaphylactic reactions